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Freakonomics radio what you don know about online dating

What You Don't Know About Online Dating (Rebroadcast),The Mary and Rankine Van Anda Entrepreneurial Professor and Professor of Economics

 · Because without money, there is no Freakonomics Radio; and without Freakonomics Radio, there is no love. Don’t be anti-love. And now, as promised, Episode  · What You Don’t Know About Online Dating. View description Share. Published Feb 6, , AM. Description; Thick markets, thin markets, and the triumph of attributes The Mary and Rankine Van Anda Entrepreneurial Professor and Professor of Economics  · Our recent podcast, “ What You Don’t Know About Online Dating,” offered an economist’s guide to dating online. Here’s one more perk: a report by CovergEx Group  · IMDb is the world's most popular and authoritative source for movie, TV and celebrity content. Find ratings and reviews for the newest movie and TV shows. Get ... read more

It says that I speak English okay. OYER: There you go, exactly. As an economist I look at that and I want to suggest the following: that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics.

They are statistical discrimination and adverse selection. OYER: No, no. One of them is they like rich men. I think I have a firm idea of the person who is probably going to like me. Can I throw a little economics jargon at you guys? OYER: What you want to remember in your profile is that you want to be very upfront and forthcoming in anything that is what an economist would call a coordination game.

In my case, I was very upfront and forthcoming in my profile about the fact that I had a large and badly behaved golden retriever, and the fact that I have two teenaged children. Because if somebody was against those things, then those were deal breakers. But the beauty of that is you still have plenty of time to learn that. You have time to experiment, make some mistakes, and then you have A time for the reasons we talk about and B you have this very thick market of available women where you live.

Well, it did. He found his significant other on JDate. Vogt, too. A few weeks after they talked, I asked P. how he changed his OkCupid profile:. VOGT: Generally, the sense that I got from talking to him was that I came off as a flippant alcoholic. So I was trying to diminish that. So I cut, I think, one reference to drinking. What I did … he said I should fill out more of the basic questions about me.

VOGT: Yes. He told me to put in a picture of myself more presentable so I took a picture of myself from a wedding …. DUBNER: Oh yeah. VOGT: Also, I put a picture with my dog, which felt like to the spirit of his advice, and a bunch of old ladies.

DUBNER: Oh my god. You are canny! This is actually a perfect mirror, in a way, of the other picture of you at the wedding with four young good looking girls. Now here you are on a park bench — in what looks like Brooklyn — holding a dog. also tweaked his profile a bit, as Paul Oyer suggested. He tried to highlight some of his best attributes…. DUBNER: Look, it is hard for me to say, but I would think if I were a woman and any guy is listing his teeth as an attribute ….

So how did it work out for P. In the year since we first released this episode … He met a girl! On OkCupid! He also now hosts a podcast called Reply All. Which you should listen to, after you finish listening to this. But the strengths of online dating are very real. Justin Wolfers is an economist at the University of Michigan.

All my Jewish friends talk about being under pressure from mom to meet a good Jewish boy or girl. I imagine this is true in other ethnic communities. Freakonomics Radio Network Newsletter Stay up-to-date on all our shows. We promise no spam. Episode Transcript Hey podcast listeners. Mandi GRZELAK: Hello! Tim BARNHART: Hey! Really well. Really, really, really well. BARNHART: Yep.

GRZELAK: We have you to thank. BARNHART: Yeah, so thank you. BARNHART: Yeah! So this is when she got crafty. She wrote a fake OkCupid profile. Very, very fake. Stephen J. DUBNER: So you set up a profile and your name is what? REED: AaronCarterFan. DUBNER: And are you, in fact, an Aaron Carter fan? DUBNER: Why?

DUBNER: Talk about some of your favorite highlights or lowlights of your profile. at the end of it. REED: L. Oh yeah.

She really enjoys it. DUBNER: Right. DUBNER: So what do you attribute that success to? DUBNER: Tell me about following up with some of these replies. DUBNER: Really? REED: Yeah. DUBNER: I am so surprised, Alli. REED: Actually, I found that a deal breaker for me was messaging AaronCarterFan. What else? All right. VOGT: Hey Paul. OYER: Hi, how are you? VOGT: Good! Nice to meet you. is a brave, brave soul — because he let us open up his OkCupid profile and pick it apart, on the radio: OYER: Have you been told before that you look like Ryan from The Office?

VOGT: No! Are they right — and would it be a dream or a nightmare? Some of them are. We try to get past the Bored Apes and the ripoffs to see if we can find art on the blockchain. But now is a good time to sort out the potential from the hype. Part 1 of a series. In ancient Rome, it was bread and circuses.

When the world went into lockdown, experts predicted a rise in intimate-partner assaults. What actually happened was more complicated. In this new podcast from the Freakonomics Radio Network, dog-cognition expert and bestselling author Alexandra Horowitz Inside of a Dog takes us inside the scruffy, curious, joyful world of dogs.

This is the first episode of Off Leash ; you can find more episodes in your podcast app now. Educators and economists tell us all the reasons college enrollment has been dropping, especially for men, and how to stop the bleeding.

As the Supreme Court considers overturning Roe v. Enrollment is down for the first time in memory, and critics complain college is too expensive, too elitist, and too politicized. The economist Chris Paxson — who happens to be the president of Brown University — does not agree.

We think of them as intellectual enclaves and the surest route to a better life. But U. colleges also operate like firms, trying to differentiate their products to win market share and prestige points. In the first episode of a special series, we ask what our chaotic system gets right — and wrong. The political scientist Yuen Yuen Ang argues that different forms of government create different styles of corruption.

The U. The British art superstar Flora Yukhnovich, the Freakonomist Steve Levitt, and the upstart American Basketball Association were all unafraid to follow their joy — despite sneers from the Establishment. Should we all be more willing to embrace the déclassé?

Does this mean sharing user data? Are some people just born lazy? Harvard economist Raj Chetty uses tax data to study inequality, kid success, and social mobility. He explains why you should be careful when choosing your grade school teachers — and your friends. Why do some activities tire your brain more than others? How exhausting is poverty? When researchers analyzed which day of the week most F. drug-safety alerts are released — and what it means for public health — they were stunned.

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Hey podcast listeners. Before we get to that: Freakonomics Radio , as you may or may not know, is produced by the public-radio station WNYC — which means it is produced in part by you, our listeners.

So please click here to donate. Now, you may be thinking to yourself … Wait a minute. Okay, I want to tell you a story, about two people — Mandi Grzelak and Tim Barnhart. Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. The very day she hears this episode, Mandi Grzelak decides to sign up for online dating.

BARNHART: So we get the check and we walk out. And I get ready to walk her to her car. I got in my 4 Runner, she got in her car. I started to drive off. And there was just this overwhelming urge to not pull out of the parking lot and, instead, pull up beside her car.

I walked towards her and we both knew what was getting ready to happen. GRZELAK: It was a great first kiss. Tim proposed to Mandi. And she said yes. And then they got married — all because of Freakonomics Radio. GRZELAK: I feel like we are forever thankful, because really I would not have gone online that night. I definitely would not have chosen the site that I did without hearing the podcast. Mandi and Tim: you are welcome. Our best wishes to the happy couple. Your money goes to WNYC which, in addition to producing Freakonomics Radio , makes great shows and podcasts like RadioLab ; Death, Sex, and Money ; On the Media , New Tech City , and many more.

I will say this: the people who listen to Freakonomics Radio are famous around here for their high rate of giving. So what are you waiting for? Join the crowd! Click here to donate and give us your money! Because without money, there is no Freakonomics Radio ; and without Freakonomics Radio , there is no love. And now, as promised, Episode No. REED: And I just moved to L. in August and got back on as a way to meet people, and get to know the city a little bit.

Reed is a comedy writer. She spent a lot of time on her OkCupid profile. Are they just looking at a picture? REED: Well, Aaron Carter is the younger brother of a Backstreet Boy who had a brief and ill-advised rap career.

T here is just no substance there in his music at all. That was what I was trying to reflect in AaronCarterFan. She wants to ruin your life. REED: To me, the worst person in the world is definitely racist.

I needed that to be a part of her. I wanted her to be believably terrible. REED: AaronCarterFan did very well. In the first 24 hours she got messages. I had the profile up for two or three weeks, and she got close to men message her. She got probably 10 times the number of messages that my real profile got. I asked my friend Rae Johnston, who is an Australian-based model and actress, if I could raid her Facebook photos.

She very kindly said yes. So Aaron Carter fan is stunningly good-looking. REED: Well, after so many messages started rolling, the optimist in me decided that these men had just seen the pretty photo and had not read her profile.

My goal at that point became to convince them that she is just awful, that she is the worst woman on earth. I would threaten to pull out their teeth. What are you doing on Friday? REED: I actually, believe it or not, did not want to meet any of these men in real life. Alli Reed wrote a fake OkCupid profile for a really good-looking year-old woman who also happened to be a racist, gold-digging, fake-pregnant-getting nightmare — and she got almost 1, replies. Paul OYER: When men are deciding who to contact on dating sites, looks matter a great deal.

An Illustration of the Pitfalls of Multiple Hypothesis Testing. Now, why did Oyer suddenly turn his attention to online dating? And, more important, he realized, dating could be much improved if only everybody approached it like an economist would. Now, of course he would say that — he is an economist.

But whoever you are, when it comes to online dating, it helps to start with some facts:. However, you will indirectly. A typical study will find that a person with one more year of education holding everything else equal makes 8 to 10 percent more than someone with one fewer year of education.

An overweight person who is otherwise medium attractive will do almost as well as a medium attractive person who is not overweight. OYER: Men, on the other hand, care a lot less about income. They find that once you get out of this world into real relationships, relationships tend to be less stable and happy if the woman makes more money than the man. So that makes sense that women should be more attracted to money than men to begin with.

Okay, so Paul Oyer knows a good bit about the rules of attraction in online dating — which, if you think about it, is just dating with a much bigger pool and a much better filter.

In other words — is he any good at giving actual online dating advice? For instance: how do you build the best profile ever? Is it better to choose a big site like Match. com or a niche site like GlutenFreeSingles. com which is real? Should you lie — and if so, about what? And P. is a brave, brave soul — because he let us open up his OkCupid profile and pick it apart, on the radio:. Vogt and Oyer sat down with Suzie Lechtenberg , a producer on our show. VOGT: Oh boy. VOGT: Okay, so it says what are you doing with your life?

VOGT: Okay. I was pretending to know but I had no idea. VOGT: Yeah. VOGT: Oh, this is the worst part. What are we looking for here? Someone to hang out with? OYER: Okay, before we even look at it, the first thing an economist is going to do is think about supply and demand. New York City is demographically more female than male. We have an oversupply of men relative to women, at least compared to other cities.

New York City and Washington D. tend to swing much more towards more available women. Now the other thing to keep in mind here is time is very much on your side. You should be picky. You should be looking for a really good match. The reason for that is suppose you do find just the right person, get married, and live happily ever after.

I should be searching a little less carefully. I should be settling. Settling is a very important idea to economists because of what we call search theory , [which] suggests that at some point you should realize that having what you have is better than expending more resources to try to do better. So Paul Oyer is telling P. Vogt that P. is in pretty good shape, dating wise. VOGT: My friends and I talk about this all the time.

What You Don’t Know About Online Dating (Replay),Episode Transcript

We think of them as intellectual enclaves and the surest route to a better life. But U.S. colleges also operate like firms, trying to differentiate their products to win market share and prestige Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Listen here or follow Freakonomics Radio on Apple Podcasts,  · Because without money, there is no Freakonomics Radio; and without Freakonomics Radio, there is no love. Don’t be anti-love. And now, as promised, Episode  · What You Don’t Know About Online Dating. View description Share. Published Feb 6, , AM. Description; Thick markets, thin markets, and the triumph of attributes  · Our recent podcast, “ What You Don’t Know About Online Dating,” offered an economist’s guide to dating online. Here’s one more perk: a report by CovergEx Group The Mary and Rankine Van Anda Entrepreneurial Professor and Professor of Economics ... read more

They are statistical discrimination and adverse selection. And a bunch of old ladies. Vogt and Oyer sat down with Suzie Lechtenberg , a producer on our show. Episode 52 Who Gets a Heart Disease Test? I was pretending to know, but I had no idea. Why Do Doctors Have to Play Defense?

We promise no spam. Vogt and Oyer sat down with Suzie Lechtenberga producer on our show. VOGT: I mean, kind of, honestly. VOGT: Yeah, I also, I put a picture with my dog. REED: Yeah. I may have made myself seem a bit more accessible in those dimensions than an honest person would say.

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